John McNicholas

ATL, GTR, LOL, BBQ

Such a wonderful game. I suggest everyone check out Monument Valley for iPhone and iPad. Magical, beautiful, and fun.

thatoneguitar:

Name: Paul Melançon
City: Atlanta, GA
Instrument: Fender Telecaster ‘85 Re-issue Pink Paisley
I found this in a music store in Gainesville, GA for $250. Someone had apparently special-ordered it, then balked once it arrived, and I suppose there wasn’t a big market for pink guitars in north Georgia.
I like a tacky guitar. When I found this one I already owned its sister version, a blue flower-print Strat, but it never really fit whatever the hell my style of playing is.  I think I became an actual guitar player over the time that I’ve owned this guitar, and the sound it makes is at least partly why. I’ve tried to make myself the sort of person who plays this sort of guitar.
I do not know what that means.
Band: Paul Melançon
Video: The Weekly Cover Thing with Paul Melancon #63

thatoneguitar:

Name: Paul Melançon

City: Atlanta, GA

Instrument: Fender Telecaster ‘85 Re-issue Pink Paisley

I found this in a music store in Gainesville, GA for $250. Someone had apparently special-ordered it, then balked once it arrived, and I suppose there wasn’t a big market for pink guitars in north Georgia.

I like a tacky guitar. When I found this one I already owned its sister version, a blue flower-print Strat, but it never really fit whatever the hell my style of playing is.  I think I became an actual guitar player over the time that I’ve owned this guitar, and the sound it makes is at least partly why. I’ve tried to make myself the sort of person who plays this sort of guitar.

I do not know what that means.

Band: Paul Melançon

Video: The Weekly Cover Thing with Paul Melancon #63

thatoneguitar:

Name: Deanna Lee Brown
Hometown: St. Louis, MO
Instrument: Gibson J-50 Deluxe
This is my guitar. I can’t make music without her. She sounds pretty. She looks prettier for the wear and tear on her. She was a gift from my husband for our wedding. I’d love her anyway, but because he gave her to me, she’s extra special.
Band: Bubbahoney
Video: He Called Me Baby Baby All Night Long

thatoneguitar:

Name: Deanna Lee Brown

Hometown: St. Louis, MO

Instrument: Gibson J-50 Deluxe

This is my guitar. I can’t make music without her. She sounds pretty. She looks prettier for the wear and tear on her. She was a gift from my husband for our wedding. I’d love her anyway, but because he gave her to me, she’s extra special.

Band: Bubbahoney

Video: He Called Me Baby Baby All Night Long

thatoneguitar:

Name: Andrés Galdames
City: Atlanta, GA
Instrument: Mid 70’s Fender Bassman 100 (Silverface)
Bought it off a band mate in 1994 as I didn’t have an amp.  A roommate of his gave it to him in lieu of rent, and he sold it along with a Peavey cab to me for $150.  One of the best monetary investments of my life.  I can’t play bass without this thing. If I use any other head, it’s just not the same experience.  Like I am playing some sort of foreign instrument that resembles a bass. 
I’m also a drummer. I love the opportunity to play another persons kit.  There is something inspiring about the way other people set up there drums, especially when it’s really different than how I set mine up. It makes me explore different ways to play and changes how I play. I get the same type of inspiration from playing different bass’ through my amp.  I have played a Jazz forever, but when I get my hands around a P bass neck, I switch things up.  Explore a little, as long as I have my Bassman 100 to play it though.  I would hate to hear what I sound like if I were forced to play someone else’s bass through someone elses’ amp.  Incidentally, I use this head as my main guitar rig if and when I ever need to.  Sounds great as a guitar amp as well.
Haven’t had much luck putting a date on the thing.  The chassis has a serial number that corresponds with a 1964 Bassman blackface, but from what I heard that just means the chassis was stamped out that particular year. Bassman 100’s were produced from 72-76.  Who knows, maybe the chassis just sat around the factory that long.
Bands: The Mendoza Line, Atticus Flinch, The Young Antiques, The Starling Family, Band. James Band.

thatoneguitar:

Name: Andrés Galdames

City: Atlanta, GA

Instrument: Mid 70’s Fender Bassman 100 (Silverface)

Bought it off a band mate in 1994 as I didn’t have an amp.  A roommate of his gave it to him in lieu of rent, and he sold it along with a Peavey cab to me for $150.  One of the best monetary investments of my life.  I can’t play bass without this thing. If I use any other head, it’s just not the same experience.  Like I am playing some sort of foreign instrument that resembles a bass. 

I’m also a drummer. I love the opportunity to play another persons kit.  There is something inspiring about the way other people set up there drums, especially when it’s really different than how I set mine up. It makes me explore different ways to play and changes how I play. I get the same type of inspiration from playing different bass’ through my amp.  I have played a Jazz forever, but when I get my hands around a P bass neck, I switch things up.  Explore a little, as long as I have my Bassman 100 to play it though.  I would hate to hear what I sound like if I were forced to play someone else’s bass through someone elses’ amp.  Incidentally, I use this head as my main guitar rig if and when I ever need to.  Sounds great as a guitar amp as well.

Haven’t had much luck putting a date on the thing.  The chassis has a serial number that corresponds with a 1964 Bassman blackface, but from what I heard that just means the chassis was stamped out that particular year. Bassman 100’s were produced from 72-76.  Who knows, maybe the chassis just sat around the factory that long.

Bands: The Mendoza Line, Atticus Flinch, The Young Antiques, The Starling Family, Band. James Band.

thatoneguitar:

Your Name: Michael Goldman 
City: Atlanta, GA
Instrument: 1937 National “O” Model
When I first began to play guitar around 12 yrs old, I was most obsessed with slide playing. Back then, slide wasn’t as accessible as it is now - there weren’t pre-fabbed slides that were commercially available, no one really taught slide and no one was building guitars dedicated to that purpose. The ‘30’s Nationals seemed to be the weapon of choice of the great slide masters and from looking at the record sleeves and few pictures that I could find, they took on a mythic quality for me. Problem was, if I could’ve found one, I couldn’t have afforded it and in Jacksonville, FL, in the late seventies no one had even seen one. I walked into a record store in 1982 and this guitar was behind the counter and it was for sale for $350.00 — an actual National in all of it’s brass and nickel plated glory. At the time for a college kid, an astronomical sum but there was no choice in the matter and somehow, I scrapped the money together and have owned this guitar ever since.
There is an indescribable magic to old Nationals. I’ve had a few but this guitar remains the “One.” Looking back on my trajectory as a guitarist, it was the few years after I bought this guitar, that what and how I wanted to play and how to have a voice of my own sort of coalesced. This National was crucial in that process. Everyone who has owned it has scratched their initials on the back, no way to treat a nice vintage instrument for sure, but this, to me, represents a river of American song going upstream through player to player all the way back to 1937. And eventually, it’ll pass from me into the hands of future players.
Nationals are back in production and many companies are building something similar and they are wonderful instruments and players can have severe option anxiety over the number of slides available on the market. Slide guitar seems to be everywhere nowadays. Despite all that, this guitar on the other hand, will always remind me that the process of making music remains a sacred mystery and ghosts are hiding in unlikely places like old metal guitars.
Bands: The Indicators, Stovall, Auction House Letters, Starr*Hustler, The Wheelknockers, The Belvederes, Schwartzkommando, The Skylarks

thatoneguitar:

Your Name: Michael Goldman

City: Atlanta, GA

Instrument: 1937 National “O” Model

When I first began to play guitar around 12 yrs old, I was most obsessed with slide playing. Back then, slide wasn’t as accessible as it is now - there weren’t pre-fabbed slides that were commercially available, no one really taught slide and no one was building guitars dedicated to that purpose. The ‘30’s Nationals seemed to be the weapon of choice of the great slide masters and from looking at the record sleeves and few pictures that I could find, they took on a mythic quality for me. Problem was, if I could’ve found one, I couldn’t have afforded it and in Jacksonville, FL, in the late seventies no one had even seen one. I walked into a record store in 1982 and this guitar was behind the counter and it was for sale for $350.00 — an actual National in all of it’s brass and nickel plated glory. At the time for a college kid, an astronomical sum but there was no choice in the matter and somehow, I scrapped the money together and have owned this guitar ever since.

There is an indescribable magic to old Nationals. I’ve had a few but this guitar remains the “One.” Looking back on my trajectory as a guitarist, it was the few years after I bought this guitar, that what and how I wanted to play and how to have a voice of my own sort of coalesced. This National was crucial in that process. Everyone who has owned it has scratched their initials on the back, no way to treat a nice vintage instrument for sure, but this, to me, represents a river of American song going upstream through player to player all the way back to 1937. And eventually, it’ll pass from me into the hands of future players.

Nationals are back in production and many companies are building something similar and they are wonderful instruments and players can have severe option anxiety over the number of slides available on the market. Slide guitar seems to be everywhere nowadays. Despite all that, this guitar on the other hand, will always remind me that the process of making music remains a sacred mystery and ghosts are hiding in unlikely places like old metal guitars.

Bands: The Indicators, Stovall, Auction House Letters, Starr*Hustler, The Wheelknockers, The Belvederes, Schwartzkommando, The Skylarks

merlin:

daveshumka:

The slowed down vocals from “Band on the Run” over the sped up instruments from “Imagine.”

No words. This is magical.

Beautiful.

CDs are in!
Zombie! (From my first APG shoot at the Goat Farm) (at The Goat Farm Arts Center)
thatoneguitar:

Name: Tracy Clark
City: Atlanta
Instrument: Vintage companion typewriter
Virginia Plane was having practice a handful of years ago, and we were tackling a song called “Old Fashioned Girl” written by Mary O. Harrison. I really had no idea what the song was about yet. Being the band’s ‘grab-bagger’ (I pick up whatever instrument I think is needed for the song…it’s anarchy), I knew it needed some kind of percussive sound…but I’m not a drummer. Shaker, tambourine, clavs, and all the usuals weren’t making the cut. I saw a basket with a handle, grabbed some drum sticks and used that for awhile. I was getting close. I decided that the song needed a harder ‘chick chick chick’ and said “if only there was, like, a really old typewriter.” With that, Mary O. said she had one — it had the perfect balance of smack and volume for the song. We’ll take it to shows, set it up on a bar stool and put a microphone right where the typebars hit the roller. Sometimes if I’m lucky, the return ‘ding’ sounds at the end of the verse line. The best part is that the song is about Mary O.’s mom, and the typewriter was hers.
Band: Virginia Plane, occasionally Chickens & Pigs, formerly Preakness
Sound Sample: Old Fashioned Girl by Virginia Plane

thatoneguitar:

Name: Tracy Clark

City: Atlanta

Instrument: Vintage companion typewriter

Virginia Plane was having practice a handful of years ago, and we were tackling a song called “Old Fashioned Girl” written by Mary O. Harrison. I really had no idea what the song was about yet. Being the band’s ‘grab-bagger’ (I pick up whatever instrument I think is needed for the song…it’s anarchy), I knew it needed some kind of percussive sound…but I’m not a drummer. Shaker, tambourine, clavs, and all the usuals weren’t making the cut. I saw a basket with a handle, grabbed some drum sticks and used that for awhile. I was getting close. I decided that the song needed a harder ‘chick chick chick’ and said “if only there was, like, a really old typewriter.” With that, Mary O. said she had one — it had the perfect balance of smack and volume for the song. We’ll take it to shows, set it up on a bar stool and put a microphone right where the typebars hit the roller. Sometimes if I’m lucky, the return ‘ding’ sounds at the end of the verse line. The best part is that the song is about Mary O.’s mom, and the typewriter was hers.

Band: Virginia Plane, occasionally Chickens & Pigs, formerly Preakness

Sound Sample: Old Fashioned Girl by Virginia Plane

That is the saddest looking breakfast… (at Turner Station Break)